Showing posts with label Programming. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Programming. Show all posts

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Top 2017-2018 Trending Online Learning Platforms

Top 2017-2018 Trending Online Learning Platforms
Top 2017-2018 Trending Online Learning Platforms 

Online Courses & ScreencastsProgramming Books (Free)
JavaScriptCode AcademyLearn StreetCode CombatCode AvengersEloquent JavaScriptJavaScript GuideSpeaking JSJS The Right WayOh My JSCanvassing
HTML & CSSCode AcademyDon’t Fear The InternetTutsplusLearn LayoutA to Z CSSDashWeb AccessibilityThe Hello WorldKhan AcademyHTML5 from ScratchMozillaDive into HTML520 Things I LearnedHTML DogHTML & CSSHTML5 for DesignersDOM EnlightenmentHTML Canvas
jQueryCode AcademyTutsplusCode SchooljQuery FundamentalsLearn jQuery
PythonCode AcademyGoogleLearn StreetPython TutorIHeartPYPython for You and Me,  Dive into PythonLearn Python the Hard WayThink PythonPython for FunTango with DjangoDjango
Ruby & Ruby on RailsCode AcademyTryRubyCode LearnRailscastsRubymonkLearn StreetWhy’s (Poignant) Guide to RubyLearn Ruby the Hard WayLearn to ProgramLearn Rails by Example
PHPCode AcademyPHP ProgrammingPractical PHP
Also see: How to Learn Regular Expressions (RegEx)
Google Apps ScriptGetting StartedOffice HoursGoogle Scripts ExamplesLearning Apps Script
WordPressTreehouseWordPress TV
Linux & Shell ScriptingStanford.eduExplain ShellConquer the Command Line
Node.jsNodetutsNode SchoolThe Node Beginner BookMixu’s Node bookNode Up and RunningMastering Node.js
Angular JSCode SchoolEgg HeadLearn AngularAngular JS TutorialThinking AngularAngular TutorialGetting Started (Adobe)
Also see: Learn Touch Typing & Code Faster
Git (version control)Code SchoolGit ImmersionGitHub TrainingUdacityPro GitLearn GitGists in Github
Objective-C (iOS & Mac)Code SchoolStanfordiTunesU
Chrome Dev ToolsCode SchoolDev Tools SecretChrome Dev Tools TutorialUdacityBuilding Browser Apps
Go LanguageGolang.orgGopherCastsProgramming in GoGo by ExampleLearning GoBuilding Web Apps with GoLearning Go
JavaLearn JavaCoding BatJava UdemyLearnerooProgramming in JavaThinking in JavaO’Reilly Learning JavaThink JavaJava & CSJava for Python Devs
Android App DevelopmentUdacity (Google Developers), CourseraThe New BostonGoogle UniversityApp Development EssentialsCode LearnApp Inventor (Visual)
D3 (data visualization)Data Visualization for the WebDashing D3D3 Tips & Tricks
Also see: Learn VIM, the text editor for programmers
SQL (Databases)SQL ZooSQL @StanfordEssential SQLSQL for NerdsIntro to SQLSQL BoltPHP & MySQL
Everything ElseUdacityedX.orgCourseraUdemy$Lynda$Pluralsight$Treehouse$Open ConsortiumOne Month Rails$

Sunday, February 1, 2015

50+ Best Free Android Tutorials | Web Resources To Learn Android Programming Online


Although, Android Programming language makes use of a specialized form of Java, the two are very different from each other. Android is defined as a software stack which consists of an operating system, key applications and middle-ware. It is meant for different kinds of mobiles and tablets. Most of the companies today are making use of Android programming language for the purpose of application development and maintenance and are constantly on the lookout for experienced Android developers. Hence, learning this language will put you one step ahead of all your competitors and will help you grab the best of jobs within the industry.

Android development expects you to be familiar with Java development. Java technology has grown huge and this may discourage a lot of people since you may think that you need to learn a lot of things before you can get started. Good news is that you do not need to learn everything in Java technology to be an android developer. Focus your learning on core java and move to Android specific tutorials/resources. 

The different kind of free web resources which will help you learn Android programming online are:

Free Websites

As a beginner, it is best to start with Android based websites which will give you a detailed description of all the aspects of an Android App (i.e. how does it look and feel) along with the capabilities of an Android platform.
  1. Official Developer Tutorial created by the android community and open source developers. This getting started tutorial is designed for beginner developers.
  2. Official Developer Tutorials Community Official developer tutorials created by android community. This tutorial is designed for experienced developers.
  3. Tutorial by Lars Vogel
    This is free single page web based tutorial created by Lars Vogel.
  4. Android Tutorials By Core Servlets 
    This site contains a series of android tutorial with exercise for each section. This site also contains some other good Java related tutorials for free.
  5. Android Hive
    Android Hive is a android tutorials blog by a enthusiastic android developer (Ravi Tamada), who likes to share his knowledge and experience with the world.
  6. Java Code Geeks
    This site contains Java and related technology tutorials and some of the Android tutorials are really useful in everyday android programming.
  7. Edumobile - This is a android tutorial blog that is created by experienced trainers. This site also offers
  8. HelloAndroid - This contains some good articles with code snippets.
  9. TutorialForAndroid
    http://www.tutorialforandroid.com/p/android-tutorials.html - is a decent blog containing few android tutorials. The Drawing with Canvas series of tutorials on this blog are really good.
  10. Marakana Android Tutorial - This is a simple location service example by a develoepr at Markana Inc.
  11. HigherPass - This site contains some android tutorials as well.
  12. How to Create Android Wallpaper
  13. Script Tutorials
  14. Android Tutorial By TutsPlus
  15. Learn Android
  16. Android Programmer Guru - Its a dedicated blog with dozens of short and useful android tutorials.

Free Video Tutorials

These video tutorials are a very effective way to start out with Android. The massive tutorial series available online contains tons of free content, which is bound to teach you coding in the best possible manner.
  1. Chet Haase Android Tutorials on YouTube - Some really good and simple tutorial by google developer and author CHET HAASE on youtube are 
  2. By Udemy
  3. By OreillyMedia
  4. By MarakanaTechTV
  5. By Android User Group
  6. XDA Developers
  7. Other YouTube Playlists
  8. http://www.youtube.com/course?list=EC2F07DBCDCC01493A
  9. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAgylfU8wrtvWlSlVhFQZtE311sProxQF
  10. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9E21BFF408167ED6
  11. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL929126B1E0480779

Free E-books

The web is loaded with hundreds of free e-books on Android programming which contain all the fundamental concepts pertaining to the language, both at the beginner as well as advanced levels. You will not only be introduced to the language but will also get to learn important application like creating user interface, connecting to the network, storing data, etc.
  1. Android Tutorial By Stanford University
  2. The Complete Android Guide
  3. Android Tutorial
  4. Commonsware Android
  5. Andbook
  6. E Reading Llib Android eBook
  7. App Inventor eBook
  8. Android Security eBook

Free White Papers

There has been many companies doing parallel research on android and its abilities. These are some of the great advanced reading reference that you can use to be an expert at android development.
  1. White Paper By ATNT
  2. White Paper By NVDIA
  3. White Paper By MCafee
  4. White Paper By Texas Instrument

Best Free Web Forums To Ask Questions

These free web forums will help you become a part of the worldwide Android community where you not only get a chance to seek solutions to your own problems but can also share your own knowledge and expertise with others.
Before you jump on to a forum make sure you check the frequently asked questions on it for exmaple this FAQ at Stack Overflow
  1. Stackoverflow
  2. Androidforums
  3. Androidcentral
  4. xda-developers
  5. Android.net
  6. AndroidForum
  7. AndroidPit

Best Free Cheat Sheets For Java/Android

Java cheat sheets will act as your quick reference guide for Android applications as well. It contains all the important information in a nut shell and helps you take a quick look at the various concepts.
  1. Computer World Cheat Sheet - Android Cheatsheet
  2. Cheatsheet for Graphic Designers - Graphic Design on Android
  3. DZone Android Cheatsheet -DZone Refcard on Android
  4. Android Guidelines Cheat Sheet By Kinvey -Android Guidelines

Sunday, January 25, 2015

5 Ways You can Learn Programming Faster


1. Look at the Example Code

Reading is usually about the words on the page, but learning to program is about code. When you're first learning to program, you should make sure to look at, and try to understand, every example. When I first learned to program, I would sometimes read the code examples before the text, and try to figure out what they did. It doesn't always work, but it did force me to look at the example very carefully, and it often helped make the writeups clearer. 

If you want to see what sample code looks like, you can read this site's introductory programming tutorial. This tutorial spends a great deal of time talking about the sample code to help you work through exactly what the code does.



2. Don't Just Read Example Code--Run It

But when you're reading a programming tutorial (or book), it's easy to look at the sample code and say "I get it, I get it, that makes sense". Of course, you might get it, but you might not get it, and you just don't know it. There's only one way to find out--do something with that code. 

If you haven't already, get a compiler like Code::Blocks set up. 

Then type the sample code into a compiler--if you type it, instead of copying and pasting it, you will really force yourself to go through everything that is there. Typing the code will force you to pay attention to the details of the syntax of the language--things like those funny semicolons that seem to go after every line. 

Then compile it and run it. Make sure it does what you think it does. 

Then change it. Software is the most easily changed machinery on the planet. You can experiment easily, try new things, see what happens; the changes will happen almost immediately, and there is no risk of death or mayhem. The easiest way to learn new language features is to take some code that works one way, and change it.

3. Write your Own Code as Soon as Possible

Once you understand something about the language--or even if you're still getting your head around it--start writing sample programs that use it. Sometimes it's hard to find good ideas for what programs to write. That's OK, you don't have to come up with every idea at the beginning. 

You can find some programming challenges on this site. 

You can also reimplement the examples from the book or tutorial you are reading. Try to do so without looking back at the sample code; it won't be as easy as it seems. This technique can work especially well if you tweak the sample code. 

If you can't think of a small program to write, but you have in mind a larger program you want to implement, like a game, you could start building small pieces that you can later use for a game. Whether you use them later or not, you will get the same useful experience.

4. Learn to Use a Debugger

I already talked about the importance of debugging in The 5 Most Common Problems New Programmers Face--And How You Can Solve Them. But it bears repeating; the sooner you learn good debugging techniques, easier it will be to learn to program. 

The first step in doing so is to learn how to use a tool called a debugger, which allows you to step through your code. 

A debugger will allow you to step line by line through a piece of code. It will let you see the values of variables, and whether the code inside an if statement is executed. 

A debugger can help you quickly answer questions about what your code is doing.
int main()
{
        int x;
        int y;
        if( x > 4 )  // <-- what is the value of x here?
        {
                y = 5;   // <-- did this line of code execute?
        }
}


A final word about debuggers: the first time you learn about a debugger, it will take you longer to fix the problems with your code. After the tenth or so bug, it will really start to pay off. And believe me, you will have way more than ten bugs in your programming career. 

I often saw students unwilling to use a debugger. These students really made life hard on themselves, taking ages to find very simple bugs. The sooner you learn to use a debugger, the sooner it will pay off.

5. Seek out More Sources

If you don't understand something, there's a good possibility the way it was explained just didn't click. 

First, look for alternative explanations. The internet is filled with information about programming, and some explanations work better for different people; you might need pictures, someone else might not. There are also lots of good books with detailed explanations. 

But if that doesn't work, the easiest way to figure out where your misunderstanding lies is to ask someone else. But try to go beyond saying, "I don't understand. Please explain." You're likely to get a link back to the same text you didn't understand. Instead, rephrase your understanding of the text in your words. The more your question reveals about what you are thinking, the easier it will be for a knowledgeable expert to answer it. Programmers sometimes have a reputation for being grumpy about answering questions, but I think the reason is that they want to make progress in a conversation, and that requires both sides to put in effort. If you ask a smart, detailed question that shows you are thinking, you will generally get good results. 

Monday, September 1, 2014

Google Is Putting $50 Million Toward Getting Girls to Code.


Mindy Kaling and Chelsea Clinton want high school girls to embrace computer science.
The two women were on hand at a Google event in New York City on Thursday called Made With Code.

Made With Code is a new Google initiative to motivate future female programmers. Only 18% of computer science degrees are earned by women, and Google is spending $50 million over the next three years to change those numbers.

More than 150 high school girls turned out for the event, including local chapters of the Girl Scouts of the USA, Black Girls Code and Girls Who Code. Kaling, a writer and actress, emceed the premiere, which brought in Google X Vice President Megan Smith, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton, iLuminate creator Miral Kotb, Pixar Director of Photography Danielle Feinberg and UNICEF Innovation cofounder Erica Kochi.

Feinberg, who has worked on films like Brave, Finding Nemo and Monsters, Inc., spoke with the group about her early experiences with coding and how it has shaped her career. She also emphasized the importance of exposing girls to how fun coding can be.

"This is something that's so important to me that I'm happy to do anything that they want me to do and be as involved as possible," she told Mashable. "I think it's much easier to connect with when you can see it and you can hear it and get all the senses involved."

Smith spoke about why she spearheaded the campaign to get girls into coding. She took a coding class in high school, but described it as boring. Her goal for Made With Code is to show girls that figuring out coding can be challenging but rewarding: "We invited you guys because we wanted to share the incredible world that we live in every day."

After each speaker shared her personal experiences with coding, Swedish house music duo Icona Pop gave a private performance. iLuminate's robotic dancers, wearing light-up suits, also performed, giving viewers a live example of how coding and dance can be combined.

Girls then had the opportunity to peruse multiple demonstrations of coding in action, ranging from the practical to the simply fun. Demos included programming — and trying on — virtual dresses, designing 3D-printable bracelets and creating a dancing avatar.

One attendee was Brittany Wenger, 19, who won the 2012 Google Science Fair for her app that accurately diagnoses breast cancer and is also minimally invasive.

"I was the only girl in my high school computer science class," Wenger told Mashable. "My teacher was a female, so it was great to be able to look up to her ... I just wish everybody had that same experience."

Made With Code isn't a one-time event. The website links girls seeking encouragement to coding meet-ups in their area. Google Helpouts also makes tutorials explaining coding concepts.


 
As part of the event, girls were able to design custom 3D-printed bracelets, courtesy of Shapeways, a NYC-based 3D printing marketplace and community.
 

Old Coders: When Programming Is a Second Career


Liz Beigle-Bryant took her first programming class, BASIC, in 1973. At the time, computers were part of the math departments instead of the engineering departments, she recalls. And because she had a background in family art, everyone at her high school discouraged her from doing so.
Beigle-Bryant, now 57, didn't revisit coding again until a couple of years ago, when she signed up for Codecademy's free online tutorials. Though there was no immediate payoff, she found learning the skill helped ease the inevitable discouragement that comes during a job hunt.

"I felt like I was accomplishing something instead of wasting time on Facebook or [playing] phone games," she says. "It helped me feel better about myself so I could project a better image."
In 2011, Beigle-Bryant was part of a round of layoffs at Microsoft, where she had worked as an administrative assistant. That career path was, by her estimate, her fourth one. Others included a job as a costume designer on the short-lived series Hypernauts in 1996, which at least got her a mention on IMBD.

In her mid-50s, Beigle-Bryant decided on a fifth career. During her unemployed period, she spent up to eight hours a day on Codecademy learning HTML and, later, Python. Eventually, she accrued the skills to land a job at the University of Washington (where she has held various roles, including migrating data), though she wound up falling back on her business administration background. Though it wasn't exactly what she had in mind, Beigle-Bryant says she's thankful. "As you get older, you're an expensive commodity [to an employer]."

Faced with similar situations of unemployment, many bemoan their fates and even give up looking for work. Others, like Beigle-Bryant, learn new skills such as programming to make themselves more attractive job candidates. 

The U.S. unemployment rate in July was 6.2%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The rate for programmers, meanwhile, is 1.3%, and the segment is projected to grow 8% over the next decade or so. Some recruiters believe there are as many as five jobs open for every applicant. As a result, the median salary for a programmer is $76,140, versus a median of $46,440 for all jobs.

The shortage of qualified applicants has led employers to lower their standards. A computer science degree is now a bonus rather than a requirement. Oftentimes, successful hires aren't even college graduates.

"I would say [we're looking for] anybody that can program," says Nicole Tucker, a recruiter for iCIMS, a New Jersey-based SaaS provider. "It's definitely the ability to be a problem solver. They have to be intellectually curious." Tucker adds that iCIMS has hired people who have learned to program via Codecademy or Coursera, another tech company that offers open online courses.
Stephen Babineau opted for something a bit more rigorous. Earlier this year, Babineau, who is a comparatively young 27, was accepted into Code Fellows, a Seattle-based company that provides intense boot camp-like courses that promise programming proficiency — even if you've never coded in your life.

Babineau, a former production assistant on Breaking Bad, among other projects, grew tired of 14-hour workdays. He also envisioned himself having a hard time with the physical demands of the job as he got older, which led him to try out for Code Fellows. Despite a lack of any programming knowledge, he was accepted and moved to Seattle for an eight-week program in the spring.

It was hard work. Babineau says he studied at Code Fellows 12 hours a day, five days a week — and then did homework on nights and weekends.In about the sixth week of the program, I got horrific eye strain," he says. "I talked to the teacher and he said take a night off, your sanity will much improve." Babineau took the advice and made it through the final leg of the program.
But it wasn't all drudgery. "I actually found that I enjoyed programming," he says.
Tucker says she looks for that passion in potential hires. The problem is, mid-career switchers aren't necessarily motivated — at least at first — by a love of coding. Inevitably, the lure of a higher salary and job stability have trumped their initial passion. That's why people are switching in the first place.

A recent study shows that switching careers solely for money and stability is a bad choice. Amy Wrzesniewski, an associate professor of organizational behavior at the Yale School of Management, and Barry Schwartz, a professor of psychology at Swarthmore College, who led the study, looked at 11,320 cadets in nine entering classes at the United States Military Academy at West Point. They found that those with strong internal motives for success did better than those who were highly internally motivated but also strongly influenced by "instrumental" motives like the ability to secure a job later in life.

"Remarkably, cadets with strong internal and strong instrumental motives for attending West Point performed worse on every measure than did those with strong internal motives but weak instrumental ones. They were less likely to graduate, less outstanding as military officers and less committed to staying in the military," the professors wrote in the New York Times.
In other words, if you like fixing things and solving puzzles, you'll probably be a better coder and enjoy work more than someone who is merely doing it for the paycheck. But that goes for many lines of work.




It's not always clear, however, if you'll enjoy coding. So you might try Ryan Hanna's method.
Hanna, now 30, spent his first seven years in the workforce in IT. He had a very limited knowledge of coding, so he started teaching himself via Codecademy in 2012. Starting with HTML, he moved on to CSS and JavaScript. "I've been through every one of their things," he says. Eventually, he was putting in 16 hours a week. "Sometimes I forced myself to do 30 minutes. Other times, I picked my head up and three hours had gone by." After five months of this, Hanna began working on building an app called Sworkit, which generates random exercise routines to meet your schedule.

Hanna thought 100 downloads sounded like an exciting number. But after the website Lifehacker ran a story on Sworkit, he got 10,000 downloads in the first month. This year, Hanna sold Sworkit to Nexercise, which hired him as well. He now has a whole new career.

It doesn't always turn out that way. Zach Sims, cofounder of Codecademy, says a minority of students finish Codecademy course — which is what you might expect since anyone can start one. Either way, since the courses are free, it can't hurt to try. "There is this common misconception that programming involves deep math knowledge, Sims says. "But it's gotten easy and abstract enough for most people."

At the very least, spending a few hours on Codecademy will offer a better understanding of some of the technologies that largely pervade our lives in 2014. "It's never going to hurt to understand or demystify the technology," Tucker, the iCIMS recruiter, says. "Even if you don't ever land a programmer job."

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.